Poverty, rate these statements, any suggestions?

edited December 2020 in Politics
One central goal of the Civil Rights Movement was black economic empowerment. Nevertheless, millions of Black Americans still live in poverty susceptible to poor living conditions in underserved inner-cities. Black americans still face a litany of problems in this 21st century. Despite gains since the end of World War II, especially the eradication of racial segregation [known as Jim Crow], serious economic, social and political issues persist in thousands of Black communities throughout this nation. In your personal view, Where are we now, and any suggestions on how we as a ethnic group of human beings get to where we collectively need to be? Suggestions and or Viewpoints here.
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  • edited December 2020
    Young people need to stay in school, period! Next, not every child is college material, but, they can go to a trade school.
    Next, nothing at all wrong with black Barber/Beauty shops, but, they generally don't hire more than (3) people. We need to start businesses that can hire a number of black people.

    Internship is another great way to encourage young folk as well as open a pathway to their careers.
    When folk have more, more is expected of them, it's past time for financially successful black entertainers to financially invest in young black teenagers striving to be successful in whatever endeavors they choose.

    LeBron James is a perfect example of a successful black Icon reinvesting in the black community by way of the Black Youth.

    I just had a new drive-way layed just a couple of months ago, I hired a well-known 'elderly' black contractor, money-wise he's very reasonable and does an excellent job. He has black sub-contractors, but, what I noticed when they started the work all of the men were at least 45yrs old and older.... I inquired why aren't there some young men learning the 'trade of masonry', he/they said, "they don't wanna learn this, it's hard work, they don't wanna be bothered".

    I just don't believe that!
  • "I just don't believe that!".

    I do, but it has more to do with the time it takes from journeyman to master mason
    First job in line is pretty much "Hey! YOU! ", and then you're a "gofer". You know, go for this, go for that
    And then, "watch this!". I shortened it, but it's all about the time of learning the trade, from the bottom on up.

  • edited January 1
    Greg wrote: »
    "I just don't believe that!".

    I do, but it has more to do with the time it takes from journeyman to master mason
    First job in line is pretty much "Hey! YOU! ", and then you're a "gofer". You know, go for this, go for that
    And then, "watch this!". I shortened it, but it's all about the time of learning the trade, from the bottom on up.

    Ok, I gree it's more to it than what I laid out here and I know it's a process, but, to say that No Young Black Man is willing to walk the 'plank' so to speak, to garner a career in construction work seems kinda off, it's a positive way to go for a lot of young men, once you get your foot in the door, money abounds, slowly but surely. I think something else is missing from the picture..

    Don't they receive journeyman pay while learning the trade, isn't the pay a little more than minimum wages?
  • Greg wrote: »
    "I just don't believe that!".

    I do, but it has more to do with the time it takes from journeyman to master mason
    First job in line is pretty much "Hey! YOU! ", and then you're a "gofer". You know, go for this, go for that
    And then, "watch this!". I shortened it, but it's all about the time of learning the trade, from the bottom on up.

    Ok, I agree it's more to it than what I laid out here and I know it's a process, but, to say that No Young Black Man is willing to walk the 'plank' so to speak, to garner a career in construction work seems kinda off, it's a positive way to go for a lot of young men, once you get your foot in the door, money abounds, slowly but surely. I think something else is missing from the picture..

    Don't they receive journeyman pay while learning the trade, isn't the pay a little more than minimum wages?

    OK...by the numbers:

    1. My first question would have been to him...'Are you advertising for young Black men, and if so, how and where?'.
    2. Are you paying comparatively good wages, with or without benefits? If so, do you mention it? Is there a "ladder" step including journeymen to the next step?
    3. And what is the step-length?

    Those are just the basics, BR. Remember dollin', you're asking for some guys to work for you, and there's only so much info to provide on their application; written or verbal, that suits everybody's needs/needs. Employer or worker(s). You know, married, single, and so on. Now then. some of this is on the prospective worker, too. Like...

    Boss: Why do you want the ass kickin', balls bustin' job, if you don't mind me asking?
    1. "I need'mo duckets to get my party and pussy gettin' $$$ on.". Or something like that.
    2. Because Mr. So And So, BR doesn't believe in birth-control and I gotta lotta mofos to feed, clothe, and keep a roof over our heads, to say nothing of feedin' fuckas.
    3. Ain't no number three. 1 and 2 were my best shots.

  • PS: As you might see, or think? Pussy plays A LOT in a guy's motivation. Muthafuckas might tell you a lie, bu me? The Down And The Dirty. Do not be fooled. I am going to tell my daughters the very same thing...when I think the Time is right. Believe it or not, or laugh at it, the Coochie-Woochie IS a prime number and factor in a man's life. PRIME, you hear me? Fuck alla'dat high hopes of being the best athlete, nerd, rocket scientist. and all that other jazz. Pussy is Number 1, as quiet as it's kept. Oh, and oh yeah. There's Love in the mix...somewhere. LOL!!!

    But, watch and see, or reflect upon the guys you went through school with. Look back, and if you can, look forward to this very day, and again. If possible. I was and still am, a class clown. But, I don't get detention after school these days. I get paid for it. The point isn't about me. It's about how you reflect on your former classmates (guys), and how you do the math. Comprende, Chica?

  • It all comes down to blacks supporting each other. Other races support each other, but blacks are selfish and think only about themselves. Imagine not one rich black has invested in Internet Hosting or Silicon Valley. They would rather stream music, sell expensive headphones and sneakers that poor blacks cannot afford. How deeply disappointing!
  • Nandi wrote: »
    It all comes down to blacks supporting each other. Other races support each other, but blacks are selfish and think only about themselves. Imagine not one rich black has invested in Internet Hosting or Silicon Valley. They would rather stream music, sell expensive headphones and sneakers that poor blacks cannot afford. How deeply disappointing!
    Nandi wrote: »
    It all comes down to blacks supporting each other. Other races support each other, but blacks are selfish and think only about themselves. Imagine not one rich black has invested in Internet Hosting or Silicon Valley. They would rather stream music, sell expensive headphones and sneakers that poor blacks cannot afford. How deeply disappointing!

    *****************************

    You are totally correct, it's No Wonder black people haven't advance to a level of (at least) self-dominance, here we are 55yrs after MLK and we're still begging the United States for Voting Rights, that this government continue to infringe upon our determination to cast our votes.
  • Nandi wrote: »
    It all comes down to blacks supporting each other. Other races support each other, but blacks are selfish and think only about themselves. Imagine not one rich black has invested in Internet Hosting or Silicon Valley. They would rather stream music, sell expensive headphones and sneakers that poor blacks cannot afford. How deeply disappointing!
    Nandi wrote: »
    It all comes down to blacks supporting each other. Other races support each other, but blacks are selfish and think only about themselves. Imagine not one rich black has invested in Internet Hosting or Silicon Valley. They would rather stream music, sell expensive headphones and sneakers that poor blacks cannot afford. How deeply disappointing!

    *****************************

    You are totally correct, it's No Wonder black people haven't advance to a level of (at least) self-dominance, here we are 55yrs after MLK and we're still begging the United States for Voting Rights, that this government continue to infringe upon our determination to cast our votes.

    Get rid of that Crabs in a basket mentality and black folks just might get somewhere. Seems like after the civil rights and slavery era blacks just committed suicide, we've forgotten who our real enemy was and still is! Apparently black lives only matter when white folks doing the killing, what about when we killing each other? What now???
  • Nandi wrote: »
    It all comes down to blacks supporting each other. Other races support each other, but blacks are selfish and think only about themselves. Imagine not one rich black has invested in Internet Hosting or Silicon Valley. They would rather stream music, sell expensive headphones and sneakers that poor blacks cannot afford. How deeply disappointing!

    *****************************

    You are totally correct, it's No Wonder black people haven't advance to a level of (at least) self-dominance, here we are 55yrs after MLK and we're still begging the United States for Voting Rights, that this government continue to infringe upon our determination to cast our votes.
    [/quote]

    Get rid of that Crabs in a basket mentality and black folks just might get somewhere. Seems like after the civil rights and slavery era blacks just committed suicide, we've forgotten who our real enemy was and still is! Apparently black lives only matter when white folks doing the killing, what about when we killing each other? What now???[/quote]

    **************************

    What do you think____ Self-Dominance mean?
  • There are things that we can do and things that we can't. I've been a part of the black economic revolution as the co-creator of Black Wall Street 2.0 although I'm sure no one heard about it.

    And we spent a lot of time thinking about this and looking at what works and what doesn't. We also spent some time trying to help black businesses. So I eventually settled on a new site that focused on service businesses that better represents the kind of companies in our community and something that could serve as a foundation. But I need a small team to help me get it off the ground.

    http://www.blackwallstreet2.com/

    Part of the formula I developed centers around the circle. Building an economy is all about keeping the money flowing in a circle that you control. For example, republicans preach trickle down economics; the idea that if you give money to rich people they will reinvest and create jobs. However, they are more likely to hoard it and buy back stock and things like that. Instead, if you give the money to poor people they will spend it out of necessity and it will push money through supply and demand and result in more jobs because companies would have to keep up with the demand created.

    In the idea I came up with black people had to support black businesses which would in turn support black non-profits which would in turn support black people. This sounds very simple but let's say you, the individual give money to your church. The church uses some of the money to help people. The rest vanishes and no one asks where it went. But because the money didn't touch the hands of black businesses they cannot grow and create jobs in our community.

    Churches rake in billions of dollars every year. Don't let them fool you. So why do we have the problems we do?

    If instead, we focus our money on our businesses, and like Amazon enforcing customer service standards, require our companies to support black non-profits, as long as the non-profits they choose are benefitting the community, whether in terms of education, job training, clinics, etc. then this helps to build up the people and increases their earning potential. Higher earnings means more money to businesses and the cycle continues.

    How do you get people to do what you need them to do?

    One of the main failures of the movement is marketing. If you have a company driving the engine, if the company is making profit, then it can afford to market the platform (like Amazon) so that black people know where to go to get the services they need. If you only have 1 site selling black soap (a painful example of a lack of product diversity) you can only really attract people to your 1 site that are interested in soap. But that traffic is wasted if there are other black products and services they want. Same thing is true of gofundme or kickstarter. Everyone on these platforms helps to market the platform.

    Therefore if we create the platform and market it well, eventually the people benefiting from it will also take part in marketing and increasing the flow of traffic. As the traffic comes in we monetize it. As it grows we add more features to reinforce the flow, making sure that people shopping on the site are benefiting from the non-profit members of the site.

    Black Wall Street was known for its prosperity and success. But we were also forced to do business with each other because of Jim Crow. Now they want our money and because we're trying to impress folks, we seem to want desperately to give them our money so we can waste money on useless name brands instead of developing our own. The notable exceptions are brands by black entertainers like Snoop Dogg. After the platform takes off I wanted it to reinvest into creating an incubator for black own brands. If we control the platform then these brands could be launched more successfully.

    Many products are already white label. A company makes a thing and someone else slaps their name on it. We also lose a certain percentage of our business to white entertainment labels and producers. And we give them the money because we understand there is a value in them providing the platform and packaging. But that's why Tidal came along. Do you see? The more we take over the means of production the more money we retain.

    It will be a long time before there is a significant amount of black products to support, but services? That's different. We probably all know at least one black owned business in a service industry.

    Unfortunately... I just can't do it all by myself and if I did, our community wouldn't trust it anyway.
  • "It will be a long time before there is a significant amount of black products to support, but services? That's different. We probably all know at least one black owned business in a service industry.

    Unfortunately... I just can't do it all by myself and if I did, our community wouldn't trust it anyway".

    The 1 & 2 parts, first.

    1. We already have one, in Houston that is. Perhaps in Dallas, too. Not sure, will find out later. Check this out: http://houstonbuyblack.com/

    2. "Unfortunately... I just can't do it all by myself and if I did, our community wouldn't trust it anyway".
    Why, not? Do you mean just you Zee? First-person singular? I can't imagine that. Or, out of pessimism, in general, period? Service the Scoop Zee, and make mine Pineapple Sherbert. B)
  • *hey stupid! hit him up for another source of income, idiot!*

    Oh Zeeeeee. Perhaps you'd like a few suggestions from one helluva promotion artiste, skilled with a certain kind of nice propaganda in the right places, legal of course, and if not, just enough to slide in Court, if it comes to that? Impeccable references. Well, the one's I submit will be...skip the whole career...that's another story altogether. And, here's a bonus...

    I know a guy VERRRRY CLOSE to us, perhaps right now for all I know, that I'm pretty sure knows his way around the Graphic Arts. Oh, I don't make his deals. He's on his own on that one.

    Just Another Gun For Hire...Greg. B)
  • If real change is to be brought about, it's also through political power, get it and you'll have the power to enact and change old laws, etc. In many states blacks need to run/gain acess to political offices! Get more black folk registed to vote! Seek to political control within your states, etc. Seek elections to become, Governors, State/Legislators, Mayors, County Commissioners, and to various other important county & state wide offices. Be in a position to effect new law and change old outdated racist laws! Education & Learned Skills alone with Practiced Economics are a great part of the keys to surviving in America's future. We must as a ethnic [black folk] race group begin to collectively work [join skills and hands] together within all neighborhoods & communities to achieve our political, economic, and social justice goals in this nation' So far we haven't began this task on a large enough scale. I assume we are too busy tearing ourselves down. Yet there are still many attempting to reach those goals, they have the right agenda, etc. Why won't we all join them?
  • 1. We already have one, in Houston that is. Perhaps in Dallas, too. Not sure, will find out later. Check this out: http://houstonbuyblack.com/

    Here's the problem with black business directories...

    So if you apply to one and you get listed, what happens if you go out of business? This is especially horrible in print form but its not much better as a PDF. Imagine using the Yellow Pages in 2021. It's inconvenient as hell. It would be nice to search for "black owned ___ near me" and actually get results. A PDF definitely can't tell you that. So while I'm not trying to hate on the Houston Chamber of Commerce this is a VERY cheap way to go about it.

    At the top of blackwallstreet2.com you can enter your key words, and see the next search field is Geo location where you can set the distance for the search results.

    Being a database, users can join and manage their own listings at any time and make changes. They don't have to wait for a chamber of commerce to publish a new directory next year. And what if they're driving into a new city? That houston website is now worthless (not to mention how much pre-planning is required to use it). So what we need is a national solution that is easy to use. It has to look professional, have good presentation, and google maps integration. We also need a built in BBB that solves disputes similar to Amazon.

    When the platform itself is valuable for getting your name out there then you will fear losing that enough to give better customer service. I haven't advertised the site at all because it doesn't have enough vendors yet to be ready for that, and still one of my only vendor listings has over 240 views.

    It even has section where vendors can post job openings. The ideas are there. I promise you that. Everything has been well thought out and useless strategies have been tossed in favor of something that works with capitalism and not against it (only because that doesn't really work either).

    I even want to eventually have African manufacturers and suppliers on the platform so that we can connect black business and create a global pipeline for black economics. The platform is there. It's not even like its so unfinished or whatever. It mainly just needs a maintenance and support team and people who can seek out and get vendors to sign up. So it primarily needs sales & marketing at this point.

    I do need to update a couple minor things, and the support/maintenance team needs to test everything and we need to make sure the paypal integration works and possibly add some other payment integration to the system but again... it really has the potential to be a great platform.
  • 2. "Unfortunately... I just can't do it all by myself and if I did, our community wouldn't trust it anyway".
    Why, not? Do you mean just you Zee? First-person singular? I can't imagine that. Or, out of pessimism, in general, period? Service the Scoop Zee, and make mine Pineapple Sherbert.


    If I were white black people wouldn't question the business opportunity. But if you're black, black people are very hesitant in contributing to a black owned and operated initiative to help our own community. The skepticism is immense and you have to be so much on point because people demand every single 't' crossed. One of the reasons black business is hard in general is because of this; because black people don't care if you're new or that all businesses require a period of growth before they can look and act like a fortune 500 company. The larger the group is, the more black people feel it can be trusted. And to some extent they're probably right. But it's a catch 22.

    My team got involved with a guy who made a lot of claims. His name was DeVon Bell. He wasn't alone. There was also a woman name Charisse Randolph who seemed to be a partner with him. There was also another older woman who came into the picture later. He wanted to partner with my team and create "Black Wall Street International". He claimed to have a lot of the things we wanted/needed, not necessarily for this site because this was a separate project from BWSI. BWSI was all about trying to get funding for black owned businesses. Bell claimed that he was already in the businesses of supplying business loans and had an established process.

    But long story short I had to protect our team from his attempt to "acquire" us trying to leverage all of our talents by offering us all 6 figure salaries. A few of the people we picked up along the way were on the BWSI team but not the BWS2.0 team. It came to the point where it just seemed like Bell was running game and not really trying to do what he said he was going to do and using us to make his own agenda look good. So fortunately we broke ties but it hurt our morale a lot and we had put our own projects on hold to some extent and between that and personal issues with my principle partner everything got frozen. I determined to do what I could and current website is a result of that effort but without a small team... there's only so much I can and am even willing to do.

    And outside of the black business owners who know me, trying to sell a platform without a team just wouldn't work. Suggestions aren't enough. I need boots on the ground. I need people who are serious and willing to talk to people. I need people who don't have to everything but are willing to put at least a little time each week into part of the business, to keep it moving forward. I'm not in a position to be picky or sift through resumes. I'm very easy to work with and I believe anyone with enough passion to actually make a difference in our community could be a great fit. It's just a matter of execution.
  • strAightalk1strAightalk1 AUGUSTA, GEORGIA
    One central goal of the Civil Rights Movement was black economic empowerment. Never the less,Black Americans still face a litany of problems in this 21st century.
    :o
  • I agree with the posts in this thread. I do have a problem with the difficulty of getting blacks to stop tearing down each other. The rich ones have alienated themselves and concentrating on their private businesses, abandoned by the rich blacks, and in their desperation have turned to gangs for support. As long as there is this big divide, progress will just be a dream.
  • I don't think the __Average Black Church__ rake in millions let alone billions of dollars. However, the black mega churches (ie) TD Jakes, Crechlow Dollar, probably pull in millions.

    I think black churches of any size should began to function primarily as a financial institution, getting heavily involved in real estate, if they can't combine their efforts to create a Black-owned bank,
    then find a bank that is favorable to blacks in financing loans at rates that are reflective of other banks.
    Then black churches should explore opening up businesses, day-care businesses, bakery business, beauty conglomartes (beauty shop and boutique), barber shops and male apparel.

    We have to combine all our efforts to establish a 'Black Wallstreet'.
  • I don't think the __Average Black Church__ rake in millions let alone billions of dollars. However, the black mega churches (ie) TD Jakes, Crechlow Dollar, probably pull in millions.

    I think black churches of any size should began to function primarily as a financial institution, getting heavily involved in real estate, if they can't combine their efforts to create a Black-owned bank,
    then find a bank that is favorable to blacks in financing loans at rates that are reflective of other banks.
    Then black churches should explore opening up businesses, day-care businesses, bakery business, beauty conglomartes (beauty shop and boutique), barber shops and male apparel.

    We have to combine all our efforts to establish a 'Black Wallstreet'.

    Who cares what u think??
  • GFB I think you are right but let us not forget that many churches are barely struggling or the majority of their black members are poor. I have not forgotten black Wall Street. I agree that they can combine those small offerings into building businesses, but all this will take a long time. I have a huge problem with rich blacks who prefer to invest in their own personal businesses, buy expensive cars, houses, yachts, and yet cannot find in their hearts the empathy to sponsor a poor black church.

    My mama always said, "put God first and every other blessing will be added to you". Let us be honest here, it is their money, they earned it and they should be free to spend it how they want. The poverty among black Americans is huge, why can't they find it in their hearts to sponsor a black church in a poor neighborhood as a charitable gift to God without expecting any paybacks in return? If you have any comments, feel free to do so. I know that black capitalism will not save us, it only destroys the poor and increases the bank accounts of the rich.

    I am very far left and realize that my ideas are not usually appreciated by centrists, leftists, independents, and right-wingers. I know it is hard to point this out but the solutions that you are pointing out will not save us. There are two authors I would recommend Adam Smith and Thomas Malthus who illustrate these points very clearly.
  • Nandi wrote: »
    Thomas Malthus who illustrate these points very clearly.

    And, for those not reading inclined for whatever reason, a film addressing Malthus' theory in cinematic terms, this one tops them all...

    gmtbjrbtwzea.png


  • I don't think the __Average Black Church__ rake in millions let alone billions of dollars. However, the black mega churches (ie) TD Jakes, Crechlow Dollar, probably pull in millions.

    I think black churches of any size should began to function primarily as a financial institution, getting heavily involved in real estate, if they can't combine their efforts to create a Black-owned bank,
    then find a bank that is favorable to blacks in financing loans at rates that are reflective of other banks.
    Then black churches should explore opening up businesses, day-care businesses, bakery business, beauty conglomartes (beauty shop and boutique), barber shops and male apparel.

    We have to combine all our efforts to establish a 'Black Wallstreet'.

    The truth is, and it is unfortunate that I know this from personal experience, pastors are often not supportive about the community as one might think, and either it gets tied up in bureaucratic red tape or you have to offer him something in exchange. I know this because we (BWS2.0) had an idea for how churches could support the black hair industry. I'll post the general plan in a new thread. But trying to take a leadership position in the black community, even a small one, is difficult because more people operate as individuals first and foremost and if you cannot give them enough for their "inconvenience" or whatever, they won't work with you. Or they don't trust you. Or they just don't want the responsibility. It's really sad. We had great ideas that would have worked. But the problem wasn't the ideas. Sadly, it was the people.

    Now if you're thinking "but my church isn't like this"... I'm not even going to mess with that. I'll just say "I hope you're right".
  • BR: We have to combine all our efforts to establish a 'Black Wallstreet'

    This is true. But when a person, me for example, asks for help doing just that people aren't jumping at the opportunity. I don't know if it is because we don't think we have the power or what? But I just shake my head and wait.
  • The truth is, and it is unfortunate that I know this from personal experience, pastors are often not supportive about the community as one might think, and either it gets tied up in bureaucratic red tape or you have to offer him something in exchange. I know this because we (BWS2.0) had an idea for how churches could support the black hair industry. I'll post the general plan in a new thread. But trying to take a leadership position in the black community, even a small one, is difficult because more people operate as individuals first and foremost and if you cannot give them enough for their "inconvenience" or whatever, they won't work with you. Or they don't trust you. Or they just don't want the responsibility. It's really sad. We had great ideas that would have worked. But the problem wasn't the ideas. Sadly, it was the people.

    Now if you're thinking "but my church isn't like this"... I'm not even going to mess with that. I'll just say "I hope you're right".[/quote]

    *******************************

    The sad truth is, black people have been __so divided__ you'll likely encounter more black people that will trust __white people__ over another black person, that's the first hurdle we have to get past.
  • The sad truth is, black people have been __so divided__ you'll likely encounter more black people that will trust __white people__ over another black person, that's the first hurdle we have to get past.

    You are correct. It's very interesting to me. Why is it? We fear each other. But at the same time, most crime is X race on X race. So we give each other reasons to distrust each other. I'm far less likely to be attacked by a white dude than a black dude. Facts. Most white dudes see me they are intimidated whether they indicate it or not. I'm not small in stature. I basically have the body of an ex-football player which is why I have been mistaken for one several times. The last time was a few weeks ago at the grocery store. A little white kid must have asked his mom and she must have thought it was a compliment to tell me. And since he was small I must have looked like a giant to him.

    But when I see other black men I never think that any of them are intimidated by my size and I've never been mistaken by a black person as a professional athlete. And since you can be any size and be shot to death (more likely if you are bigger) I'm more likely to be shot as proof the shooter wasn't "scared" of me and yet, shooting me confirms it. And yet, guys tend to think that killing someone makes them hard and tough when in reality it's something they do out of fear. Almost all killing is typically done out of fear.

    We think about what whites do to us as a collective, but now typically what they, as individuals, do or can do. So we're not generally afraid of them, as individuals, knowing we can beat them up and they would only really shoot us if they happened to be carrying at the time. A black person though... They'll act tough, find you later when you're not even looking, and shoot you in the back. Why? Because we're breeding both weakness and fear into each other. And I think a lot of it has to do with our music.
  • ZealotX wrote: »
    The sad truth is, black people have been __so divided__ you'll likely encounter more black people that will trust __white people__ over another black person, that's the first hurdle we have to get past.

    You are correct. It's very interesting to me. Why is it? We fear each other. But at the same time, most crime is X race on X race. So we give each other reasons to distrust each other. I'm far less likely to be attacked by a white dude than a black dude. Facts. Most white dudes see me they are intimidated whether they indicate it or not. I'm not small in stature. I basically have the body of an ex-football player which is why I have been mistaken for one several times. The last time was a few weeks ago at the grocery store. A little white kid must have asked his mom and she must have thought it was a compliment to tell me. And since he was small I must have looked like a giant to him.

    But when I see other black men I never think that any of them are intimidated by my size and I've never been mistaken by a black person as a professional athlete. And since you can be any size and be shot to death (more likely if you are bigger) I'm more likely to be shot as proof the shooter wasn't "scared" of me and yet, shooting me confirms it. And yet, guys tend to think that killing someone makes them hard and tough when in reality it's something they do out of fear. Almost all killing is typically done out of fear.

    We think about what whites do to us as a collective, but now typically what they, as individuals, do or can do. So we're not generally afraid of them, as individuals, knowing we can beat them up and they would only really shoot us if they happened to be carrying at the time. A black person though... They'll act tough, find you later when you're not even looking, and shoot you in the back. Why? Because we're breeding both weakness and fear into each other. And I think a lot of it has to do with our music.

    ****************************

    So when you get right down to the ___Meat & Potatoes___is there really any hope for the black race to become another "Black Wall Street"?
  • So when you get right down to the ___Meat & Potatoes___is there really any hope for the black race to become another "Black Wall Street"?

    Not without rich black folk leading the way; which is exactly how the original started. However, unlike the original, black people are allowed to shop at white stores. However, if our "stars"... for example.... what Michael Jordan did for Nike.... what if he did it for a black company or what if black people bought up all the public shares of Nike before we decided to be such a big consumer. The problem is not that we need companies to be "all black". The problem is that we need the MONEY/PROFITS/REVENUE/ROI to go back to our community. I'd put some white faces behind a counter in a heartbeat to get more white customers. Because THEN you're getting money from THEIR community and you can invest that money in ours.

    But our strategy has to match our emotional passion. And we have to sustain emotional passion longer than the time that George Floyd couldn't breathe, because it's pointless if we cannot maintain a movement long enough for it to be effective.

    Even as consumers we prefer image over money and that's a strategy for failure, not success. I don't want to perpetuate the same power dynamic.
  • ZealotX wrote: »
    So when you get right down to the ___Meat & Potatoes___is there really any hope for the black race to become another "Black Wall Street"?

    Not without rich black folk leading the way; which is exactly how the original started. However, unlike the original, black people are allowed to shop at white stores. However, if our "stars"... for example.... what Michael Jordan did for Nike.... what if he did it for a black company or what if black people bought up all the public shares of Nike before we decided to be such a big consumer. The problem is not that we need companies to be "all black". The problem is that we need the MONEY/PROFITS/REVENUE/ROI to go back to our community. I'd put some white faces behind a counter in a heartbeat to get more white customers. Because THEN you're getting money from THEIR community and you can invest that money in ours.

    But our strategy has to match our emotional passion. And we have to sustain emotional passion longer than the time that George Floyd couldn't breathe, because it's pointless if we cannot maintain a movement long enough for it to be effective.

    Even as consumers we prefer image over money and that's a strategy for failure, not success. I don't want to perpetuate the same power dynamic.

    *********************************

    Yeah, there has to be a collective mentality amongst the ___WOKE___ black folk knowing they must first find the fortitude to UNITE, once we move through that process, obviously it would take black people that are financially viable to monetarily get the ball rolling (ONCE) there's a meeting/understanding of what needs to be accomplished at the initial beginning, until we purposely ____UNITE, the dynamics of where we go from there would literally be endless, however as usual ___Talk is Cheap and even worse ____a waste of time.
  • edited September 6
    One central goal of the Civil Rights Movement was black economic empowerment. Nevertheless, millions of Black Americans still live in poverty susceptible to poor living conditions in underserved inner-cities. Black americans still face a litany of problems in this 21st century. Despite gains since the end of World War II, especially the eradication of racial segregation [known as Jim Crow], serious economic, social and political issues persist in thousands of Black communities throughout this nation. In your personal view, Where are we now, and any suggestions on how we as a ethnic group of human beings get to where we collectively need to be? Suggestions and or Viewpoints here.

    First, we cannot mention the successes of the Civil Rights movement without dealing with the fallout of the government led campaigns against Black people at the time. History tells us that the US government has consistently attacked, lied, cheated, and destroyed Black movements beginning at their foundations. The FBI specifically set programs to frame, jail, or kill our movement leaders. Once we recognize the external forces against us then we can deal with the other issue.

    Second, Black people lost our community a while ago. We haven't been able to build another community because of internal forces; specifically our relationships between the people of a defeated and disabled 'race'. Black women are distracted with feminism and money, Men are distracted with gangs and drugs. **And both get trapped in the injustice system of the USA.

    It is good to recognize the population of 'rich' Black people but remember that even our richest Black American is basically middle class in America. Also, many of them aren't even concerned with the problems of Black folk.

    If economic empowerment was the goal of the Civil Rights Movement then it was a compete failure. But I thought that the Civil Rights movement was about ending segregation...which it did. I mean MLK Jr. had the chance with Johnson. But it wasn't until after that, before his death, that he really began to address the economic issues in serious detail and of course he talked about ending the war in Vietnam.
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